Mash up

30 09 2008

I don’t really know where to begin today! 

Excited first of all as I got a text today from the head teacher of my school in Malawi today saying they had received and given out all of the photos and letters I had sent out during the middle of August.  Then when I got home from Body Attack (I don’t know how anyone can’t love exercise if they try Attack!) there was an envelope from Malawi, one of many that I had left stamped and addressed to me, with letters from each of the teachers inside telling me all about what they had been doing since I left.  It’s hard to know how much they are actually doing of what they say but I will give them the benefit of the doubt!

Apparently puncuality is better and they are using all of my strategies for that, they are using my new timetables and the composite class are still working together and it is a lot better.  They are improving in mental maths, thinking critically, marking each others work, using the ball and number fans etc for active learning.  I had totally forgotten till it was mentioned that I had bought about 100 red pens in Dedza and passed them onto the depute at the inservice training for peer marking as the kids had thought if they were doing that they would have to provide their own red pens and they really wanted to use red to see what the corrections were etc. 

Even if not all of this is being done how, or as much, as we might do it just to know that they are still trying and that they are obviously very keen to keep contact is so rewarding.  I am in the process of beginning to officially link Castlefield Primary with this school and I now think it will work really well.  I can’t wait to go back next year!!!!  One of the questions from one teacher was ‘Can’t you change your mind to come here again?’ and she finished by saying I wish you could come back again very soon!

There was also a card for my brother that had got missed when I was given the other ones, so now I can give the one to my sister-in-law as well that I had been keeping back as I would have felt bad only giving one to her!

I feel I have missed the boat with writing anything much about SLF now, I enjoyed a weekend in Aberdeen with 4 very special kids instead.  One thing to mention about that is that I took them to see The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas and I would highly recommend it.  The kids were p.7, 2nd year (those 2 had read it in 1st year and done a lot of work on it) and 4th year and they all really enjoyed it and thought it was very well done and true to the book as did I.  The only thing would be I would say the ending was more graphic/real than I expected, I do not think the book goes into that much detail and some kids might find that upsetting.  It was the longest silence I have heard, or not heard, at the end of a film in ages but considering the most recent trips I can remember have been to see Sex and the City and Harry Potter that is not surprising!

So back to SLF and all I will say is I really enjoyed although it was a totally different experience for me as I was on the SLC stand quite a lot and seeing it from a new angle.  I felt I did a rubbish presentation in the Glowing Lounge but I was last and most things had been said before me, and anyway according to Andrea I did okay (as her adopted daughter!).

I signed up for TeachMeet and to go out for dinner after and this was a big deal for me as I may have done loads of things recently, like go to Malawi for 5 weeks with strangers, but I still felt I was going to be shy and awkward with all of these people I only knew from blogs.  Luckily Jaye was going as well and looked after me!

She and I both had to disapear off quickly on the Thursday to the next part of our Leadership and Management in Education course, of which we are now doing the second compulsory module.  After a late night on the Wed night at the above ‘Local Government in Context’ was not perhaps the most exciting topic for 3 hours after driving up to Hamilton and it’s fair to say I struggled a bit!  I am enjoying the course in general though and spent my holiday Monday in my pyjamas writing my assignment (I eventually got dressed at 6.45pm to go to the running club, how shocking is that, but at least it was not to go to the pub!)  I will write a bit more about that shortly – just letting my proof reader look over it just now – but it is basically a self-reflection of your career and practice so far and an action plan to follow on from that.  Followed by a critical evaluation of a leadership article but I am putting that bit off!  As Andrea Reid’s adopted daughter I have to say that she features heavily in what I was writing in my reflection as I can honestly say I would not be the person I am today, and that is professionally and personally, without her support/guidance/pushing/mentoring/everything really.  And I have only known her 3 1/2 years!

Advertisements




Reinforcing the message at insets!

12 09 2008

Tuesday 22nd July

Each of the insets from Tuesday to Thursday would last from 9am to 3pm with a half hour break in the morning which we went for at 10.40am and lunch was an hour beginning at 12.30pm.  Even deciding this was not straightforward as we had to decide what was going into each session and how long it would be.  On the Tuesday as it was management and leadership there would be about 40-50 teachers there; mostly heads and deputies.  On the other days there would be 70 as there was actually another zone that had been invited to come the whole week as well even though they had not had any global teachers.

We knew from the outset that teachers would be late but we had to show a good example and start on time so we tried to start with something that it would not be too bad if people missed.  We also tried very hard to stick to the timetable we had on display to show good practice with this. 

We had decided our saying for the day, which actually really turned into everyone’s saying the whole week, was:

‘The teacher is the most important resource in the classroom’.

It became a mantra that we always had on the blackboards, timetables and flipchart sheets, as well as saying it all of the time.

We actually ended up being a bit late starting though which we were quite annoyed about as we were ready to leave when Link said but they were not.  It takes about an hour and a half to get to Tchetsa zone and we were picking up the PEA’s for both zones on the way so it was a long time in the land rover each day.  So by the time we actually started and had the welcome and prayer most people were there; some of whom had travelled a long way to get there for that time!

All of us were aiming to make all of our sessions all week as active as possible as again we wanted to set a good example.  We also did walt and wilf, plenaries, other AIFL techniques, brain gym and self-evaluations.

Timetable for the day

Timetable for the day

We started off with team building as our first session, after an initial ice-breaker.  We used the characteristics of a football team for this to give an example and then had some group work on characteristics of an effective team.  We had a flip chart prepared after that to show the benefits of teamwork.

Benefits of teamwork

Benefits of teamwork

We then used this to introduce work on staff meetings.  Our statement for this was:

‘One of the ways of bringing staff together and working together as a team is to use staff meetings.’

We asked the teachers to do think, pair, share to discuss what staff meetings could be used for and we during the share part of this we recorded the ideas on a mind map.  I led this part and think I did pretty well in speaking slowly and being understood.  I have the evidence of this as I was videoed doing this and on looking back afterwards I could see the improvement I have made over time.  So now I will need to just pretend whenever I am doing public speaking that English is not the audience’s first language!  It also made my accent not sound so bad, as usually I hate listening to myself but this was not so cringe worthy!  We then displayed for them what we considered to be the elements of an effective staff meeting and discussed this with them.

What can staff meetings be used for?

What can staff meetings be used for?

It had been made clear to us that the teachers should all be taking notes for their own CPD and that they should come prepared to do this but also that some wouldn’t (!) so we bought pads of paper and pencils etc and dished them out.  We decided to tell them that we would let them know when we specifically wanted them to write something down and be clear about what woudl be written for them to copy later rather than them either not writing anything or trying to write everything we said as we had also been told that some would not do it unless seriously prompted.  We found throughout though that the teachers were more enthusiastic and willing than I think they had been given credit for and most were writing things either at break or lunch because they wanted to know it all.

Use recycling to play at lunch!

Use recycling to play at lunch!

After break – during which they were given a bottle of juice and a roll and this happened again at lunch – we looked at the key roles of heads, deputies and section heads and split them into these groups for this.  We asked them to brainstorm what they thought the key roles were and then decide on the top ten through voting individually for their top three and counting them up.  I took the deputies and I had to prompt them for things like setting a good example on time keeping and things that we were trying to push the message across on.  We thought, and this did happen, that very adminy things would come across and we wanted to try to get away from that.

The roles of the DHt, before narrowing them down

The roles of the DHt, before narrowing them down

We then brought everyone back together and had some discussion with the whole group.  We then put our ideas up on flip chart paper (for schools here, not Scotland) and compared and contrasted them.  Instead of saying any were particularly right or wrong we then asked them individually, and without having to share it, to think about whether they would now change their top three and record that for themselves.

What they thought the role of the deputy HT was

What they thought the role of the deputy HT was

 

What we thought the roles of the DHT and Section Heads were

What we thought the roles of the DHT and Section Heads were

What we thought the role of the HT was

What we thought the role of the HT was

In the afternoon we looked at monitoring, and as with all of the day there was so much we wanted to cover and so little time that we had to focus on just a couple of things – these being timekeeping, timetabling and classroom observation.

We began with timekeeping and had the following questions on the board:

Why should teachers be on time?

How can teachers best support learners?

What is the managements role?

We asked for ideas and stuck them up on the board too.  We then gave them a list of strategies that they could use to encourage staff, trying to be mostly positive but we did also say what they should do if the situation did continue with an individual (and we had consulted the PEA on this).

This did lead to one of the funniest moments of the day as one of our strategies was simply to praise and thank individual teachers who came to school on time every day for a week.  Someone asked us for an example of this so we thought they meant a demonstration of giving praise !?  I went for it (and drama is not something I am usually into) and laid it on really thick to Jill, who pretended to be the teacher as I pretended to be the head teacher.  I was practically hugging her and going on about how pleased I was etc etc and she was nearly in tears as she was so grateful and so on.  Well when we finished the same person said ‘so you didn’t mean a reward of money then’!  We had a good laugh about it afterwards and hopefully it still taught them something.  Emmanuel later said (as he sat in on everything) that he thought it was great and learned a lot from it so maybe the others did too as I don’t think they are in the habit of praising each other at all!

We then moved them into their school groups and looked at timetabling to try to minimise learners missing out by latecoming or lack of teachers.  We asked them to discuss:

Is the timetable being followed?

What are the strengths and weaknesses of your school timetable?

They were asked to give feedback on one weakness and one strength and then to discuss how they could minimise the timetable weakness they had just identified.  Most of them had said the timetable was being followed, maybe because the PEA was in the room?, but then their weaknesses showed that this could not possibly be the case.  We gave them strategies to help them but this was where we ran into resistance as things like changing the school day, changing when maths and language was done or making composite classes some of them just could not see the benefits of.

We did not have much time left for classroom observation but did ask them for their comments on what the purpose of a classroom observation was and then gave them strategies on how to do it.  We did a role play on feedback with me being the head teacher again.  First we showed a bad example of it with Jill being the teacher again and nearly in tears again but this time because I gave her such rotten feedback and then with Robert as the teacher and I gave him constructive feedback using 2 stars and a wish.  They thought the one with Jill was hilarious as she was acting the part so well!  They are on video to be used later!

Each day we did a recap and an evaluation and although we handed them into Link I kept a note of some of the comments and will write them up later.  It was the first time I had experience of having written feedback on inset I delivered and as soon as we were in the land rover I read them all out to everyone – which was not easy in the back of that and on such bumpy roads.

I had already been feeling like I was getting a bit of a cold but ended up running back the last 3 miles or so to the hotel – in the dark and feeling awful, one of my worst ever runs.  Check my running blog for the full story of why I ended up doing that; Emmanuel was so helpful about dropping us off but I would rather not have gone, didn’t feel I could say that though!  Straight to bed after the meeting with no dinner!

Wednesday 23rd July

I was off on Wednesday with Jill and Kirsty, unfortunately I was feeling pretty lousy with the cold and had no energy as I had not eaten any dinner the night before after a really bad running experience.  I still did not feel like eating today as I had a bit of a sore stomach too so although we went to Dedza pottery for lunch I only ate a bit of a roll and a scone.    Other than that I only ate some tea biscuits and rice just to make sure i only had plain stuff.

There are a few touristy shops in Dedza – and we went to them all!  I got some pottery to go with what I bought last year and some cards but apart from that I was pretty sensible.  I got a lot last year and I had so many gifts to take home I did not have much room in my bags!

It felt really weird being at the meeting that night when I had not been out doing an inset during the day.  Stayed up afterwards to do more planning for the next day with Jill and Kim.

Thursday 24th July

Back off to Tschetsa today with Jill and Kim, Roger and Emmanuel.  I was feeling rubbish with the cold still and it felt like a really long way to get there!  Most of my staff were there today and this would be the last time I would see everyone except my head teacher.

It was literacy and numeracy today and we started with literacy and more specifically phonics.  We asked for some think, pair, share on what literacy meant to them.  We gave thinking time first and they were getting used to this by now but at first on Tuesday it had been really hard for them.  We had gone for one minute thinking time but we were lucky if they managed 15 seconds.  Better today though!

Kim led the next session for nearly an hour on phonics and she was amazing!  We looked at making sounds and simple words with the most common sounds in english.  We then asked them to think of the 6 most common Chichewa sounds, which took a while, and then we made some common words up with them.  This does not sound like much but we spent quite a long time on each bit and the teachers were very interested in it and very enthusiastic!

Kim at work on phonics

Kim at work on phonics

We split the time up with some brain gym and then did some literacy activities before break, which we just did between us.  We put a group of words up on the board and they had to spell them on each other’s backs, we also had them try to make other words with the word ‘hospital’ which they were very competitive about and some other activities which I now can’t remember, or understand what I wrote now!

After break we moved onto mental maths and filler activities.  We specifically wanted to show activities that the teacher did not have to be there, since that happened a lot!  It would mean children would still have a useful activity to do.  We started off with the counting stick, including crossing over 100.  We used sugar cane for this to show them another example of talular (teaching and learning using locally available resources) and they got to keep the sugar cane afterwards, which they closely guarded!

working with the sugar cane for maths

working with the sugar cane for maths

We had had to stop on the way to get sugar cane and we cleaned out the boy at the side of the road that we stopped for.  He was delighted as he was now off the hook to go and play all day!

Again we just split all of these activities up between us and did rythmn clapping next in different ways and the pendulum swing. 

We then played slam which went down an absolute storm, once they got the idea!  We put numbers on the board and they had to give sums that made that answer and played countdown.  There were some other activities we did as well and we made sure we discussed ways of encouraging thinking and participation particularly in games like countdown.

The PEA, Mr Balaka, did the next part which was great as we had wanted them to be involved.  He did self and peer assessment and had them moving about, discussing and being active.  I have lots of video clips of today which I will try to make into a more coherent short film and post at some point.  The October holiday would have been the perfect opportunity but the Chicago Marathon is going to get in the way!

Mr Balaka at work

Mr Balaka at work

Mr Balaka was good but his style was still so totally different to ours.  Not that ours was perfect, although KIm and Jill were amazing I thought, but he was not as encouraging, it was more of a ‘you must do this without question’ way of doing it I thought.  Great though that he was getting involved and on something so important as self and peer assessment.  The teachers were a little resistant to soem of this as they thought it would encourage cheating.

In the afternoon we were doing a session on developing literacy using books, well really Jill was doing it!  I videod the whole thing as she was so good.  I told her afterwards it would be perfect for showing students as a model lesson.  She had the book of The Hungry Caterpillar, told the teachers they were all going to be children for the afternoon and proceeded to spend 45-60 mins telling them the story.  Of course she started with the cover and pictures, the back, the author etc and told the story asking many open questions the whole way through and using wonderful expression.  It felt like a real privelage to be watching it and the teachers absolutely loved it.

I was supposed to follow this up with how to use books for older pupils and we had wanted to use the textbooks they have but they only had one copy at the school as the older ones take their books home.  We were also really running out of time and I just had time to show them how to ask questions about the title and the one picture while then describing how they should read it with the children, and make sure they understand the english etc.  We hit home on that point as many times as we possibly could; that there was no point in doing all of the teaching and reading in english if they did not understand and that it was okay to explain in Chichewa.

I was feeling better today stomach wise and asked Emmanuel if it was possible to stop in Mayani for chips, especially since I had helped him do the money all lunchtime.  (This was reimbursing the teachers for their lunch and travel expenses.)  Of course he said yes and I did enjoy them!  They are much nicer than the chips here as it is nicer potatoes, the chips are cooked fresh for you and the oil seems nicer.

We are really late back every day coming all the way from Tchetsa and we were pretty much having our meetings nearly as soon as we got back, as even though we finished the insets at 3 it was much later than that when we actually left as we would be talking to people etc.  I found it hard to today to say bye to Mr Kalivute, the deputy head, as he had been so great and Jill’s family lived right beside the school and she had to say bye to them.  I was crying for her just about as there was a young teenage boy in her family who had been really great and had been very upset to see her go when we left the villages that I met today and had to watch them say bye again. 

Sharon, Shiraz, Maureen and I spent some time in the evening preparing the inset for the next day on p.e and a general recap of the week.  Sharon and I had already done a lot of it one night before dinner – in bed as it was cold!  We were so busy doing it we did not even notice the electricity had gone and I was managing to write in the dark.  When someone came to offer us candles they thought we were a bit odd!  As it was the last day it was only going on until 12 o’clock which meant there was not that much time to do a lot.  We were going to Sharon’s zone which was nice not to be travelling so far and to see somewhere else, and we got to have Emmanuel as our driver still so even better!

I commented to Sharon that we were doing the equivalent of getting **** faced every night, except with chocolate and crisps rather than alcohol.  I had been so good in the village but it was partly tiredness and the cold etc, I just really wanted comfort food even though I was really enjoying myself.  We even ordered tea one night and got into bed with our tea and chocolate – bliss!  Although we were trying to write our big evaluations at the same time – not so blissful now!  Our diaries also fell way behind this week and I finished writing mine up on the plane which is why I keep having to say I have forgotten things from these days!





What happened next….

7 09 2008

On the plus side these posts should not now be so long, on the minus side for those reading there will be less photos to break it up, although that is a plus for me as it was a really annoying part of it! 

There are less photos now as I finished my memory cards when I left the village and had already deleted lots of photos, there were no more that I felt I did not mind losing.  I can’t believe I did not take the other camera as well as that had about another 600 photos available!  I had 420 or so that I used up on mine.  I took a lot of video footage to make up for it and some photos on the video camera but they did not turn out very well.  We are all swapping photos so I will get some but it is taking a while.

Anyway, when we left the village we had another 4 teachers to pick up and I spent 5 hours in the land rover!  First we had to go and meet the Isuzu with two teachers in it and swap over so all the luggage was in that and we were all in the landrover.  We were early to meet them in Mayani and got to go and have a wander around.  I met one of the boys from St5 which was nice to get to say bye to him and then another 3 people I knew from other schools or World Vision. It was really bizarre – I don’t meet people I know randomly wandering around Glasgow!

We picked up Jill, Clare and Kim and got to have lunch at Kim’s house which was good since I had met them before.  We were all really emotional every time one of us was saying bye to our family, that is until we picked up Robert – he wasn’t emotional!  I started to feel quite numb though as I was so upset to have left my kids.

Sharon and I discovered when we arrived at Panjira Lodge that we had to share which at the time we were a bit annoyed about, as even though we had got on well we both wanted our own space.  I think we were both the same in that we were a bit worried what we were going to feel like that night and would rather have been by ourselves.

Our bedroom in Panjira Lodge

Our bedroom in Panjira Lodge

the bathroom caused some problems later!  And was crawling with ants!

the bathroom caused some problems later! And was crawling with ants!

 

We had a bit of time when we got back before dinner, during which time Taggart came on Malawi tv!  Not that we had a tv in our room, far from it, but there was one in the dining room.  Although I have not written it I am sure we went down to the supermarket and bought crisps and chocolate.  I was determined this would be a one off as a treat for feeling so emotional but it would turn out to be a very regular occurance.  It was not what I planned after not having any treats etc in the village to stay good!  Dinners (and lunches when we were there) were always pretty much the same in Panjire Lodge – rice and veg curry (or stew which meant the same as the curry without the spices) and green veg.  It was fine but got very samey!

outside at Panjira Lodge

outside at Panjira Lodge

We had to have a meeting that night which we were not expecting, in fact we were quite shocked, and very, very tired.  I actually did find it okay in the end though, we were just asked to highlight professional and personal highlights and challenges.  My highlights were the running with the kids and the paired reading.  I can’t remember my professional challenge but it was probably the timekeeping and professionalism of the teachers.  I could not think of a personal challenge as everything I had thought would be a challenge, ie toilets, rats, english were not at all so I said being forced to eat so much.  These were anonymous and we had them on flip charts in small groups but it was glaringly obvious which mine were of the personal ones!

Sunday 20th July

We actually got a couple of hours off this morning!  Got to go on the computers in the office and that was when I first updated my blog myself.  I had also just found out that Debs was pregnant and so spent the rest of the time reading her blog as she had not published her whw race report either before I left.  Other people were emailing or reading news etc but that was far more interesting, and exciting to read about the baby!

just outside our hotel - the prison is the white building on the right!

just outside our hotel - the prison is the white building on the right!

Sharon and I realised today that actually it was fine to be sharing, we had just been unsure of how we would be last night and in fact it turned out to be great fun and I enjoyed this part of the trip so much partly because of this.  We maybe encouraged each other a bit too much with the chocolate though!  It was actually nice to have someone there to talk over what had happened to each of us.

We spent some more time self-evaluating in the morning and what we ended up with was sheets and sheets of all of the things we had all achieved in our schools.  This made us all a lot happier and more confident about our time there to see it all up on the wall and it look like a huge amount.

We split up in the afternoon to do our inset planning.  There were 14 of us divided into different groups for 4 days of inset.  We each got one day off.  We split into groups of the people who were planning for the inset and then had another that we would be participating in but not doing the planning for and another on the last day that we would plan for later in the week.

Sharon, Kirsty, Claire, Kristeen and I were doing the planning for the leadership and management inset, during which we would try to hit some of the hard issues like timekeeping, timetabling and professionalism.  We were still planning for it in the evening after dinner – see the photo!  It was really cold in the lodge, especially at night and we were all so tired it was surprising we managed to leave the room and get back to our own to go to sleep!  Incidentally we were not having to plan during the day in the bedrooms, it was only as we were so cold and tired at night!

a bit tired!

a bit tired!

Monday 21st July

We basically worked all day on the insets today.  It was very hard going and far harder than being in our villages.  We all felt the timetabling for all of this was difficult with so much prep to do when we were so tired but it was Link’s first time of trying these insets and they openly said they were learning to!  Ultimately it would be well worth it as they went so well and we felt the teachers got a lot out of it but it was hard at this stage.  We had to finish our own prep and then hear from the other groups what our other day was that we were participating in was like and explain to the others about ours.  None of us, for obvious reasons, felt as prepared for the other one as for the one we had prepared for.

I felt this was really useful, I had work with peers on something difficult and explain it to others.  It involved working with Master, who was part of the link staff and the PEA for a different zone whom I had not met before so there were a lot issues to work through and we had to be quite diplomatic too!

We were all desperate to go out for dinner tonight as it would be the first time in the trip we chose our own food and we just wanted to go somewhere different and not associated with where we were working.  On reflection it was a bad idea as were served and it took a long time to get seated ie 1 and 1/2 hours, although once seated we were served quickly.  This was despite stating the time we wanted to eat at when we ordered at lunchtime!  It was at Dedza pottery which is lovely though and I think probably the only really decent place to eat in Dedza!  It also turned out to be a bad idea as after no dairy or rich food for weeks some of us felt quite an effect afterwards as it was very much like that there!





In the beginning…..

6 08 2008

I have put this off and put it off but I am going to have to start writing up some of my activities from my experience.  I am just going to start at the beginning and write up bits at a time – hopefully I will finish before the holidays finish!

As was stated in my blog earlier I pretty much slept the whole way there which is very unusual for me anywhere, never mind on a plane but end-of-term-itis it certainly was and it is just as well as I was rather worried when I got on the Ethiopian Airways plane and realised there were no individual t.v’s; they are usually what gets me through a flight!  Not that I know what I was expecting but I was also a bit disapointed that the shopping in Addis Ababa airport was nothing like J’burg where I really went to town last year on buying books and jewellery.  None of us had also realised how long it would take to do anything with 16 of us and I had no chance to buy books in Heathrow as we ended up with not much time to transfer.  That was worrying as I usually read a lot and I had not brought many with the express intention of buying books at Heathrow to save on weight in Glasgow.  There was a lot of book swapping going on later on in July!

We were met by several of the LINK staff in Lilongwe on the Saturday and taken into the capital for lunch and to buy some supplies in the supermarket.  We were advised we might want to buy some treats to keep for ourselves in our village but I was utterly determined I was not going to put on weight while away and only bought a packet of low fat crackers as a treat.  It was also suggested though that as we would probably be given dry bread we might want a spread of some sort.  So oddly enough and as a huge treat for me, I found and bought in a Malawian supermarket MARMITE! 

I only ate the crackers latterly in the village so that I did not have to take them back to Dedza and only got out the marmite (in secret) on my second last day in the village when I had had enough of dry bread (most of the time I felt it was fine plain).

We then transferred to Dedza where we would have 2 nights at Panjira Lodge which was fine but very basic.  We had a welcome meeting, dinner and then were all in bed very early!  Robert and I ran on Sunday morning but that is all in my running blog.

We were allowed some time on the Sunday morning to go and visit the town and were taken round by one of the LINK staff.  We visited the court (our hotel was also right beside the prison), police station, education office, stadium and market.  We all bought chitenji’s in the market which are pieces of material that women use over their clothes most of the time.  I never got the hang of tucking mine in correctly despite numerous attempts by my host mother to show me so ended up tying it all the time!

The courthouse in Dedza

The courthouse in Dedza

Our work started that afternoon with orientation and meetings.  This amusingly included a demonstration of how to use a pit latrine by Ed the programme manager!  I wish I had thought to film it!

I was getting pretty worried about going out to the village by this stage as I was panicking that I would not be able to cope with pit latrines, the family possibly not speaking english, rats and also I was really worried I would get upset a lot with the standard of living for the children in the village.  I really did wonder how I had possibly thought I could do this!

On Monday morning (30th June) we had a welcome ceremony at the hotel and then after lunch we were being transferred to our villages.  There were various important people there that gave speeches but it was amusing (and bemusing) to see several people there to listen read the newspapers or send messages on their phones or even talk on their phones during the speeches!  There were 5 of us going to one zone, the most remote zone, and we met our PEA (Primary Education Advisor) for the zone, Mr Balaka.  He seemed very enthusiastic although I got a bit worried when he asked me to not only work in my school but also do some work in another school nearby (ish!).

My zone - Kim, Clare, Robert, Mr Balaka, myself and Jill

My zone - Kim, Clare, Robert, Mr Balaka, myself and Jill

I was transferred in the land rover with 6 others and our bags were taken in a separate vehicle where the bags were out in the open.  When I got my bags at my village I realised my mistake in taking a brand new rucksack and my nice London Marathon sports bag as my luggage.  Dirt tracks for several hours have meant these bags will never be the same again!

Just about time to go!

Just about time to go!

I spent 4 hours in the land rover as I was dropped off last and spent most of that sitting right in the back.  Worryingly the back door would not open but did not seem to be shut properly either so I spent a lot of time worrying it would fly open and I would end up flying out of the door, and with the speed Wilford was driving at, that would have been nasty.  I ended up thinking I was going to have concussion on my first night in the village as I was flown up out of my seat at one point, banging my head on the roof!

I got strangely attached to the land rover!

I got strangely attached to the land rover!

It was quite emotional dropping everyone else off as the people who were waiting out to meet them were so excited and welcoming.  I got dropped off at 5.30pm by which point it was nearly dark and I think my village had given up on me coming!





Not long now

1 06 2008

I have just got home from Edinburgh where I have been at the second training weekend for the global teachers programme.  It is now only 3 weeks on Friday (that is quite scary sounding!) until we go and this weekend has really made it seem real!  It was also very exciting, for most of us this was probably due to the fact we got given a profile about our school and a letter/profile about our host family.  The other great thing was meeting last years GT’s and getting to ask them all of our questions.

I think we are getting our profiles emailed to us so if we do I will post them on here.  My school is called Gwengwe Primary School and has 381 pupils and 5 teachers which includes the HT and DHT and is split to 3 males and 2 females.  Of this number two of these are volunteer teachers so are untrained and there can be difficulties paying them.  The pupil to teacher ratio is 76:1 which is good for Malawi.  There seems to be good support from the community and the school is in fairly good condition – there are desks in every classroom and pupil: textbook ratio is supposedly 1:1 which would be extremely unusual.  We were warned not take all of the information as correct!

I will be living with Mrs Dalikeni Chiziya and her four year old son.  There was no mention of a father but this does not mean there is not one about apparently – he might just not have been there the day the profiles were made up.  They rely on farming and the house is located only 50m from the school with a borehole for water 100m away.  The house has two bedrooms and I will have one of them.  In the letter it said they liked chatting to friends in their spare time and listening to the radio; although they do not actually have one!  The mother is hoping I will take out ‘Scottish music on a cassette that we can listen to’ so I guess I need to be looking for portable radios and cd players preferably with some wind up charger!

The village has a small shop to buy soft drinks, matches, biscuits etc and there is a tea room!  It is supposedly 50km from Dedza and 10km from Mayani trading centre which has shops and transport links and a health centre and probably a market.  I am not that close to other global teachers although near a main road so it might not be difficult to meet up.

We got all of this information on Friday night and spent the rest of the night talking about that and locating our village on a map of the district. 


               Where we are all going

On Saturday we got information about education in the Dedza region specifically, a session on strategies for working in schools, a Chichewa language session, advice on running our INSET’s in the TDC’s (Teacher Development Centres) and a display from last year’s GT’s as well as talks from Kay Livingstone from LTS and Elizabeth Williamson from the Scottish Government.  When we do the INSET’s I will be taking (with a couple of other GT’s) full day sessions on Leadership and Management, Numeracy and Literacy and PE so I was quite happy that I got what I had expressed most interest in.

Today was really about living and coping dilemas both with our host families and in the schools and there were some difficult issues that we had to discuss, all of which had happened to former GT’s.  These included:

  • LCD has told your host family that you would prefer not to eat meat yet you can tell they have spent a lot of their allowance on buying meat for special meals.  They say it is a sign of respect and honouring you as a guest.  How do you respond?

          Being vegetarian I got a bit worried about this one!

  • A local trader becomes very insistent that you help him get work in the UK.  You pass his stall every day on the way home.  Tactics and strategies?
  • Certain cultural customs disturb you, such as children, particularly girls, kneeling when speaking to male teachers.  You do not want them to do this when speaking to you.  What is the best course of action?
  • After three weeks of all your efforts, the young teacher to whom you are giving the most support is still allowing corporal punishment.  Although she is not doing it herself, she is allowing a senior pupil to walk around swishing a stick.  The Head Teacher is not too concerned.  What would you do?

The last one there was quite interesting as my group were discussing this one and we thought you would have to leave it as you had tried, it is a custom and the Head Teacher was not concerned.  It is not supposed to be allowed though.  We had with us this weekend a Malawian who works for LINK in Dedza and he discussed this with us and said that actually we could take it further, either to the School Management Committee or to the head of the zone.  During the whole weekend it was really useful to have Wilford there as he could answer so much for us.

We also had an input on glow today and out of this years and last years GT’s it was interesting to see how few had any involvement with Glow so far; that is about 30 teachers across a number of authorities.  I guess I have become so involved with it that I have not realised how many councils/people still have to come onboard.  I ended up showing a couple of my glow groups as they were to do with Malawi and I think that one of my outcomes for LINK is going to be about using glow with past and present global teachers to share resources etc.

I would say there are three things I now have left to do:

  •  buy things like wind up chargers, batteries, gifts etc
  • photocopy/collect AIFL things etc and get the kids to make stuff
  • pack! – We only have a 20kg allowance so this could be tricky!

And get something stronger for the plane – we have five flights on the way home, although I was told by someone from last year that we do not get off the plane every time, but it is Malawi – Zambia – Ethiopia Rome – London – Glasgow.  I will have had my fill of flying after that, unfortunate that it is only 10 weeks after that I will be flying to Chicago!

Also really worried now as several of last years GT’s said they put on weight; no wonder after they also then told me all of the stodgy, carbohydrate type food that we would be eating.  I had already thought of starting a running club at my school as my excuse for going running and not appearing like a totally crazy white woman but I may have to do it 2 or 3 times a day!


             Chichewa language session